Musicians Call on Lionsgate to Stop Taking Taxpayer Dollars to Score Movies Overseas

July 3, 2014

Members of the American Federation of Musicians (AFM) are speaking out against movie studios that accept tax credits to film in the United States, then create the scores for those films overseas. Lionsgate, for instance, had revenue last year of $2.7 billion, millions of which came from tax credits—yet it paid musicians less money in Macedonia to score such films as the recent Kevin Costner film "Draft Day." AFM says its members’ total earnings from scoring movies have fallen by half since 2007.

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